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Wednesday, 20 February 2013 11:17

Hackers do the impossible

Written by Nick Farrell



Break Apple’s security

Hackers have managed to do the impossible and break into the super secure Apple networks. Everyone in the Tame Apple Press knows that Apple creates the most secure systems in the world and that viruses only exist on Windows machines, so this latest news has them scratching their heads.

What happened is that Apple was attacked by hackers who infected Macintosh computers of some employees. It is not clear how this happened as employees at Apple are creative geniuses who bring about perfection. It has been suggested that Microsoft staff must have gained access to the building, installed PCs and then installed the malware.

Although some reports think say that the malware had been designed to attack Mac computers. This is unlikely as there is no malware for mac machines and reporter who says that is rightfully told that they are not proper journalists. What is more likely is that the software, which infected Macs exploited a flaw in a version of Java software used as a plug-in on Web browsers. So it was clearly not Apple’s fault at all. The malware was also employed in attacks against Mac computers used by "other companies," Apple said, without elaborating on the scale of the assault.

Investigations into the breaches are ongoing. It was not immediately clear when the attacks had begun, the extent to which the hackers had succeeded in stealing data from targeted systems, or whether all infected machines have been identified. Security firm F-Secure suggested that the attackers might have been trying to get access to the code for apps on smartphones, seeking a way to infect millions of end-users.

Last modified on Wednesday, 20 February 2013 14:19

Nick Farrell

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