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Thursday, 21 February 2013 11:28

Businesses see cloud as cure for cancer

Written by Nick Farrell



Don’t hold your breath

More companies are starting to see cloud computing as the saviour of all their business problems, according to a new survey of people in the know.

The study of 1,300 executives, conducted by Rackspace Hosting with support from Manchester Business School in the UK said that Cloud computing was “delivering savings and flexibility for existing organizations” (as opposed to those who don’t exist).
Apparently it is laying the groundwork for a new generation of business startups, curing cancer and ridding the world of Justine Bieber.

Sixty-two percent of respondents either agreed totally or somewhat with the statement that “cloud computing is a key factor in the recent boom of entrepreneurs and start-ups,” the survey finds. A quarter agreed strongly with this statement.
Most of the executives were speaking from experience. Over 43 percent of the group, in fact, say their businesses were launched just within the past three years. More than half of respondents with startups in the survey said they would have not have been able to afford on-premises IT resources, or would have had difficulty acquiring computer systems, if it weren’t for cloud computing.

About 43 percent say the availability of cloud-based resources has made it “a lot easier” to set up their businesses and half said that cloud computing has helped their organizations to compete with larger companies.

Nick Farrell

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