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Thursday, 28 February 2013 22:01

Sapphire Edge VS8 Mini-PC reviewed - Cooling and power consumption

Written by Sanjin Rados

edge-vs8-thumbtop-value-2008-lr 

Review: Better performance

The VS8 is a bit bigger than the HD series, so it should feature better cooling and fortunately it does. Ensuring good airflow in such a tiny chassis will always be a challenge, as the size of the heatsing and fan is limited by the width of the chassis.

As the graphics core is integrated in the CPU, the whole cooling system consists of a single heatpipe with a heatsink and fan. The Edge VS8 needs to be mounted upright to provide the best possible airflow. The really good news is that the VS8 is quieter than the Edge HD4, which is quieter than the Edge HD3. Unlike HD series systems, it is almost completely silent in idle. The fan becomes audible under load, but it really did not bother us much.

It’s possible to adjust the fan speed in bios. At idle the CPU temperature is 44°C, but under load it can hit 67°C. These results are pretty good, especially when compared to the HD3 and they are roughly on par with the Edge HD4, based on a Sandy Bridge Celeron 847 CPU.

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Last modified on Friday, 01 March 2013 05:40
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