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Thursday, 28 February 2013 11:45

New iPhone app tests urine for medical conditions

Written by Peter Scott



Diabetes, infections, cancers and liver problems

Got a urinary tract infection? Now there’s an app for that, too. A team of innovators has shown off a very interesting iPhone app at the TED conference in Los Angeles.

The Ucheck app allows users to test their urine for a range of medical conditions. Of course, even the mighty iPhone can’t handle the analysis itself, so the $20 app comes with test strips and a special mat, supplied with the app to normalize colours shown by the strips.

All the user has to do then is take a photo of the mat and the software will analyze the colours and deliver the good, or bad news. It sounds pretty clever, and perhaps more importantly, pretty cheap.

The app was developed by TED fellow Myshkin Ingawale, who told the BBC that he wants to get medical health checks into users’ hands. The price is also rather appealing and it could allow doctors in mobile clinics in any part of the world to conduct simple tests, without the need for a specialized and bulky lab.

Ingawate said an Android version is also on the way, which means his tech could be even cheaper and accessible to more people in need.

Peter Scott

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