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Monday, 04 March 2013 10:37

Apple continues war on flash

Written by Nick Farrell



Safari will not use old versions

Apple has continued its war on Flash by banning old editions from its market leading Safari browser. For a while now Apple has blamed Flash for corrupting the perfection of its operating system. Now under the pretext of tightening up security in its Safari Web browser it has decided to block older versions of Flash.

In some ways it is fair enough. Adobe has been patching its Flash technology to fix a few security flaws. However Apple is identifying the older versions of Flash as Malware with its Xprotect scanner. Xprotect is Apple’s joke of an AV protector which it installed after the illusion of Apple’s software being secure was shattered. While the software has not been very good at stopping malware it is jolly good at rooting out software that Steve Jobs did not approve of, including Flash.

Apple last week admitted that it was targeted as part of an organized hacking attempt that capitalized on Java vulnerabilities, but did not target the company's customers. Earlier this week Adobe pushed out a software update that patched three vulnerabilities in Flash, two of which it said were designed to target Mozilla's Firefox browser.

Nick Farrell

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