Featured Articles

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple has finally unveiled its eagerly awaited smartwatch and surprisingly it has dropped the "i" from the brand, calling it simply…

More...
Skylake 14nm announced

Skylake 14nm announced

Kirk B. Skaugen, Senior Vice President General Manager, PC Client Group has showcased Skylake, Intel’s second generation 14nm architecture.

More...
Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

The day has finally come and it appears that most rumors were actually spot on as Apple has now officially unveiled…

More...
CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich just kicked off the IDF 2014 keynote and it started with a phone avatar, some Katy Perry…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 07 March 2013 12:07

Google not responsible for woman’s good name

Written by Nick Farrell



You can’t sue

A Wisconsin woman failed in her attempt to get a US court to protect her "wholesome" image after Google searches linked her name to drugs to treat sexual dysfunction.

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago said on Wednesday Beverly Stayart could not show that Google violated Wisconsin privacy laws by misusing her name to generate advertising revenue. Stayart said that if you did a search for "bev stayart" on Google you got a recommended search for "bev stayart levitra," which can direct users to websites that offer treatments for male erectile dysfunction.

She claimed that this was at odds with her "positive and wholesome image" linked to her advocacy for animal rights, her research in genealogy, her published poems and her MBA degree from the University of Chicago. Her lack of a penis to be dysfunctional was not mentioned in court.

The three judges said that Google's alleged improper use of Stayart's name fell within the "public interest" and "incidental use" exceptions to Wisconsin's misappropriation laws, either of which would doom the lawsuit. Circuit Judge Ann Claire Williams pointed out that by suing Google she had made the search "bev stayart levitra" a matter of public interest. She also sued Yahoo over similar claims, and she lost.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments