Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 11 March 2013 10:39

Apple boss brought to book

Written by Nick Farrell



Anti-trust antics

Apple CEO Tim Cook is likely to be dragged into court in the government's lawsuit against the company over alleged price-setting in the e-book market.

US District Judge Denise Cote on Friday said she will hold a telephone conference on March 13 to consider the government's request for Cook's testimony. Apple is the only one remaining defendant in the lawsuit brought against the iPhone maker and five other publishers last April for allegedly conspiring to raise prices of e-books to challenge the dominance of Amazon.com.

So far all the publishers have backed down, leaving Jobs’ Mob insisting it was perfectly ok to set up a cartel which fixed the price of ebooks. The government asked in March 6 Cook's testimony. So far the Justice Department is not seeking monetary damages but a judicial decree that Apple violated antitrust law. This will allow Apple to be sued while at the same time forcing it to behave in the future.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments