Featured Articles

Broadwell to be faster than Skylake-S in desktop

Broadwell to be faster than Skylake-S in desktop

Intel will do something that it never did before. It will release two processor generations at once in the desktop space.…

More...
ARM’s signs off on 64 bit ARMv8-A

ARM’s signs off on 64 bit ARMv8-A

British chip designer ARM has just signed off its 50th licensing agreement for its ARMv8-A technology, which includes support for 64-bit…

More...
Intel Business vPro market divided into 7 categories

Intel Business vPro market divided into 7 categories

Just a few years ago we had two market segments for business users. We had desktops and notebooks and now Intel…

More...
GTA 5 will make November release

GTA 5 will make November release

While we have continued to hear that Grand Theft Auto V for the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC will not…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 28 March 2013 16:57

EVGA GTX 650 Ti BOOST Superclocked reviewed - Thermals, Noise and Consumption

Written by Sanjin Rados

650 ti boost sc thumb recommended08 75

Review: Good performance at a tempting price

 
EVGA GTX 650 Ti Boost Superclocked is completely silent while idling. While gaming, the fan can be audible, but it is quiet enough not to be considered a distraction. On the whole we were pleased, and the good temperature/noise ratio was attained thanks to EVGA’s custom cooler. As we can see from the screenshots, the temperatures were kept at bay, even with an overclocked GPU.

650 ti boost superclocked load crysis 2


650 ti boost superclocked idle

 

In terms of power consumption, the GTX 650 Ti Boost does rather well. The XFX Radeon HD 7850, which offers similar performance, consumes a bit less power than EVGA’s factory overlocked card.

The typical power draw for the reference card in so-called non-TDP apps is 115W. Nvidia claims the TDP is 140W. If we take the power slider to 110 percent, as is recommended for overclocking, we hit 127W in non-TDP apps. EVGA’s GTX 650 Ti Boost Superclocked uses slightly, more power than the reference card. Since it is powered through the PCIe slot and 6-pin power connector, it could theoretically draw up to 150W, so there is more than enough headroom. In any case GPU Boost should keep power consumption in check and throttle the clocks accordingly. We measured system consumption, without the monitor, of course.


power

(Page 19 of 20)
Last modified on Wednesday, 03 April 2013 07:09
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments