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Thursday, 28 March 2013 09:56

British press hide behind paywalls

Written by Nick Farrell



Sign of the times

It is starting to look like the press will start to hide behind paywalls.

The UK’s flagship tabloid, the Sun, is the latest to put its boobies and other news behind a paywall and charge for online access. This is a little challenging because Sun readers are not the sorts that are that technically able to sign up for an online subscription. We are sure that Rupert Murdoch's News International have worked a way to get to readers credit cards. The Sun said that the existing free online version was "untenable" which is rather a long word for the Sun.

Chief executive, Mike Darcey, said the free site was threatening the tabloid's circulation and revenues. The Sun follows the Telegraph which announced on Tuesday it would begin charging readers for online access. It will allow online readers free access to 20 articles each month, following which they will be charged a monthly subscription fee.

Darcey told the Guardian it was just untenable to have 2.4 million paying 40p for the Sun at the same time as a bunch of other people are getting it for free.

Nick Farrell

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