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Friday, 29 March 2013 09:17

Teardown reveals HTC One is unfixable

Written by Fudzilla staff



Gets 1 out of 10 from iFixit

The HTC One looks like bulletproof phone, with a hefty aluminium - glass body and no removable back. 

However, there is a price to pay for its robust unibody design. Teardown specialists iFixit found that the new phone is practically impossible to open up and repair. It got a score of one, one out of ten that is.

Simply opening the device proved impossible without a heat gun and a suction cup. Even after the aluminium chassis was removed, it proved more than a match for the iFixit team. The components are covered in a thin copper shielding which is nearly impossible to get around.

Replacing the battery doesn’t seem to be a walk in the park, either. Small wonder then that the HTC One got the lowest possible iFixit score. It is nothing unusual, tablets and phones are getting increasingly difficult to take apart and repair.

On the other hand, it might be good news for Samsung, which used a more traditional approach in the Galaxy S4.

You can check out the teardown here.


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