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Friday, 29 March 2013 10:27

Intel creates real computer Wargames

Written by Nick Farrell



Just play noughts and crosses on it

Intel is working with the US Army's Orlando simulation-research lab to create computerised war games capable of handling hundreds of participants at once.

The goal of the project is to create a computing network powerful enough to deliver interactive training simulations to large groups of players around the world. Of course those who have seen the flick Wargames can be re-assured that the computer will not be plugged into the US weapons grid.

Using "cloud computing," the new system would eclipse not only the military's current remote-training systems but also commercial "massive multi-player" websites. Intel’s Mic Bowman said that Second Life is the closest thing to what we're doing, but even that limits the number of players to 60 or 80 per region. Apparently that's not nearly enough for the kind of higher-level engagement training the Army needs to do, but Intel’s system will be able to support at least five times that many.

The research is part of Intel’s experiments in to Cloud computing. It wants heavy duty network software out of the project.

Nick Farrell

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