Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 08 April 2013 10:31

Drug dealers love Apple’s iMessage

Written by Peter Scott

DEA can’t touch it

Apple’s iMessage service is incredibly convenient, reliable and secure, perhaps even a bit too secure. In fact, the US Drug Enforcement Agency is moaning about not being able to trace and intercept messages sent using the service.

In an internal document obtained by CNET, the DEA complains that messages sent via iMessage are next to impossible to intercept, even with a valid warrant.

"IMessages between two Apple devices are considered encrypted communication and cannot be intercepted, regardless of the cell phone service provider," said the DEA. Naturally, the DEA refused to comment the report.

This is not the first time law enforcement ran into a brick wall when dealing with messaging services. A couple of years ago authorities in London found themselves unable to tap Blackberry messages sent by rioters.

Apple might be able to dial down the security, or store copies of all messages for law enforcement, but this doesn’t appear to be on the table, at least not yet. The only hope is that drug smugglers will start using Apple Maps on their Cessnas, and drop their Columbian goodies all over the Aleutians instead of the Florida Keys.

Peter Scott

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments