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Friday, 12 April 2013 07:13

GTX 650 Ti Boost SLI reviewed - Conclusion

Written by Sanjin Rados

nvidia
Review: Relatively good value

 

Judging by the benchmarks, two GTX 650 Ti Boost cards in SLI can deliver some top notch results at 1080p. The cheapest GTX 650 Ti Boost sells for about €150-160, which means you should be able to get two for €310 plus shipping, of course. An HD 7950 costs €260, while the GTX 670 goes for €310. The GTX 650 Ti Boost SLI setup clearly outpaces the HD 7950, but then again the HD 7950 costs about €40-50 less.

The dilemma is whether there is any point in getting two weaker cards chained in SLI rather than a single, more powerful card. Unsurprisingly, most users will go for the latter option.

However, the addition of SLI on an affordable mid-range card might be a boon for gamers on a budget. It basically means that you can get a €150 card and upgrade your system down the road with a second card, probably at a much lower price. That’s why the decision to include SLI on the Boost makes sense. In case you decide you need more performance after all, upgrading your rig a year from now with a second card should be easy. In contrast, getting a second €250-300 card is a bit more painful for the old credit card.

On the whole, SLI and CrossFire drivers work very well, much better than a few years ago. Driver profiles for new games are being constantly updated, so you shouldn’t have any issues with upcoming titles. In other words, consumers should not avoid SLI or CrossFire. They are no longer reserved for ultra high end gaming rigs and with practically no driver issues they are a perfectly sound choice for the average gamer.

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Last modified on Friday, 12 April 2013 09:04
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