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Tuesday, 23 April 2013 09:50

Women are a security risk

Written by Nick Farrell



Even worse than men apparently

The latest study into British worker’s security habits appear to indicate that women have worse attitudes than blokes.

QA, an IT training company commisioned YouGov to survey 1,197 British workers on their attitude to IT security at work, and found that whilst men are no angels, women are the worst offenders when it comes to their work password security. Apparently women are 26 per cent more likely to write down their passwords so they don’t forget them. They are 40 per cent more likely to share their password with friends and family and 42 per cent more likely to share passwords with a colleague

Only a fifth of men also admit to writing them down so they don’t forget them, we guess though they are more likely to forget them. Women are 29 per cent more likely to be unaware whether their company has an IT security policy than men, the survey claimed.

Nick Farrell

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