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Wednesday, 24 April 2013 10:33

Playing Tetris good for the eyes

Written by Nick Farrell



As opposed to porn which makes you go blind

A team of researchers from McGill University has found Tetris to be a good treatment for lazy eye or amblyopia. The team used a pair of video goggles which they tuned so that they could make both eyes work as a team. 

Nine volunteers with amblyopia were asked to wear the goggles for an hour a day over the next two weeks while playing Tetris, the falling building block video game. The goggles allowed one eye to see only the falling objects, while the other eye could see only the blocks that accumulate on the ground.

A control team of nine volunteers with amblyopia wore similar goggles but had their good eye covered, and watched the whole game through only their lazy eye. At the end of the two weeks, the group who used both eyes had more improvement in their vision than the patched group.

At the moment the only cure for lazy eye is surgery or wearing an eye patch for months which is a lot nastier than having to play Tetris for a few weeks.

Nick Farrell

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