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Tuesday, 07 May 2013 10:13

Texas prisoners have Facebook pages

Written by Nick Farrell



Smuggled smartphones

Texas inmates have worked out ways to use smuggled smartphones to post pictures and status updates to Facebook. According to Local2 news reports there is an outcry over how prisoners are using illegal methods to do something so banal.

“People who have been locked up should be dealing drugs and running criminal syndicates online, not chatting their mates on Facebook,” a Texas resident did not say.

Convicted murderer Timothy Barta was one of the inmates busted posting on Facebook with an illegal smartphone. He is serving life sentence and apparently his photograph still scares the bejessus out of Bill Hawkins, a former Harris County prosecutor who handled Barta's case. Of course there are also victims groups complaining that it is all a way of making them feel bad.

Bruce Toney, inspector general for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice said that arresting prisoners was not exactly rocket science. He was able to identify many offenders that have illegal cell phones and smartphones all because they are intent on keeping up their Facebook page from their prison cell, he said.

Nick Farrell

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