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Monday, 13 May 2013 10:23

Bloomberg snoops on Wall Street

Written by Nick Farrell



And the Lamb lies down on Broadway

Money men Goldman Sachs discovered much to its horror that hacks have been watching them through Bloomberg terminals.

Traders throughout the financial world depend on Bloomberg terminals for real-time data on markets of all kinds as well as news and instant messaging. They are not cheap and cost $20,000 a year to rent. According to Wired in a recent conversation with a Goldman executive, a Bloomberg reporter mentioned that a partner at the bank hadn't logged into his terminal recently. The only way he could have known that was if the media agency had monitored the terminal.

Bloomberg spokesman Ty Trippet said limited customer relationship data has long been available to our journalists. But this does not include clients' security-level data, position data, trading data or messages. Journalists also couldn't see what news stories users read and what securities they viewed, though they could access details on when users had logged into their terminals, when they became subscribers and what sorts of functions they were using.

However since Goldman made its concerns public, Bloomberg has decided to disable journalist access to this customer relationship information for all clients.

Nick Farrell

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