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Tuesday, 18 June 2013 12:20

Companies rubbish at Big Data security

Written by Nick Farrell

Only 35 per cent can detect security breaches

Big Data could flounder because companies are rubbish when it comes to security, according to a new report from AV outfit McAfee.

The report with the catchy title Needle in a Datastack said only 35 per cent of businesses can quickly detect security breaches, as many organisations can’t handle big data. It highlighted how companies could not properly analyse and store big data and they take far too long to detect data breaches.

Only a third of them can find a breach within minutes. But 22 per cent said they need a whole day, while 5 per cent said they would need a week. Mike Fey, executive vice president and worldwide Chief Technology Officer at McAfee said that if businesses were in a fight, you need to know that while it’s happening, not afterwards.

“This study has shown what we’ve long suspected – that far too few organizations have real-time access to the simple question ‘am I being breached?’ Only by knowing this, can you stop it from happening.”

Nick Farrell

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