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Friday, 05 July 2013 09:11

Jay-Z app hacked

Written by Nick Farrell

It’s a hard knock life

Popular beat combo artist Jay-Z’s Android app for Samsung is has been hacked by anti-US government protestors. The app would give users a free copy of the latest Jay-Z record, ‘Magna Carta Holy Grail’, before it is released to the general public. The first million downloads came with a copy, whilst the app itself promises footage of the rapper and supplementary material for the album.

But insecurity outfit McAfee, meanwhile, discovered an app that did many of the same things as the Jay-Z app, but instead protested against President Obama. The app was supposed to replace the wallpaper on the infected device with an altered image of President Obama. It then includes satiric nods to reports of mass NSA surveillance, as revealed by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

McAfee wrote in a blog post that the malware app functions identically to the legit app. But in the in the background, the malware sends info about the infected device to an external server every time the phone restarts. The malware then attempts to download and install additional packages.

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