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Tuesday, 16 July 2013 13:39

UK police taking mobile phones at the border

Written by Nick Farrell

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Saving you from terror


UK coppers are taking the mobile phones of people entering the UK and download their personal data, in a bid to save the world from terrorism.

Police apparently can stop anyone at random at UK air, sea and rail ports to seize and retain all the data on their mobiles phones. According to the Telegraph the British are taking call history, contact lists, photos and recent contacts.  They are forbidden to to take the content of any messages sent by text or email.  Apparently the powers are so broad that police do not even have to show reasonable suspicion for seizing a mobile phone.  They are allowed to hold onto the information for as long as they like. 

More than 60,000 people a year are examined as they enter or return to the UK under powers contained in the Terrorism Act 2000, but said the number of data seizures is unknown.

Nick Farrell

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