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Tuesday, 30 July 2013 09:31

Mobile Broadwell in 2H 2014

Written by Fuad Abazovic

Slight delay for 14nm parts?

According to the latest roadmaps that Intel sent to its partners it looks like that the company is facing a slight delay in its schedule.

Intel has been executing its tick tock strategy for years, and it looks like that there might be a slight delay in sight. Broadwell, a 14nm die shrink of Haswell, is supposed to get out in the latter part of 2014. The new roadmap has revealed that the Haswell refresh part is set to replace Haswell on the desktop side and that Broadwell kicks in, in the 2H 2014.

Intel’s Broadwell is set to replace the Core i7 and Core i5 U-series, Y-series as well as higher performance HQ-series. All of these parts are expected after Q2 2014, so in 2H 2014. There is no indication if this happens in Q3 or Q4, at least Intel doesn’t want to reveal that much details.

Haswell is already a very power efficient core, and with the 14nm shrink it aims to be even better. Once can estimate some 30 percent better power, lower voltage and with further optimizations it will simply do better.

Intel will be able to get to 14nm before the ARM competition goes slowly to 20nm in early 2014, which is Intel’s big advantage.

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