Featured Articles

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 16 August 2013 08:16

China might ban US tech companies

Written by Nick Farrell

Trade war

A trade war is brewing between the US and China thanks to the American claims that Huawei and ZTE are using their gear to spy. Xenophobic US senators have banned Huawei and ZTE hardware from government use because they could be used to spy on US secrets. There has been no evidence that this has ever happened, but the US claims that since Huawei’s CEO worked for the Chinese military 20 years ago it must be spy gear.

China rightly pointed out that this was not so much a spying accusation as a desperate attempt to protect American companies from cheaper Chinese competition. Now it seems that China's Ministry of Public Security is planning a tit for tat “investigation” against top US companies over “security issues.”

This means IBM, Oracle and EMC could suffer see themselves banned from selling in China. The company names are on the Chinese list because of revelations by former US spy agency contractor Edward Snowden that they were involved in a National Security Agency hack into critical network infrastructure at universities in China and in Hong Kong.

Documents leaked by Snowden revealed that the NSA has had access to vast amounts of Internet data such as emails, chat rooms and video from large companies, including Facebook and Google, under a government program known as Prism.

"At present, thanks to their technological superiority, many of our core information technology systems are basically dominated by foreign hardware and software firms, but the Prism scandal implies security problems," the newspaper quoted an anonymous source as saying.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments