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Friday, 16 August 2013 09:12

Intel and Corning developing a new optical interconnect

Written by Nick Farrell

Speeding up the servers

Intel and Corning are planning to release a new optical interconnect technology capable of 1.6 terabits per second. MXC is supposed to speed up the interconnection of servers in data centres. 

But there are signs that the tech could trickle down down to consumer gear. After all Thunderbolt interface was originally an optical interconnect called Light Peak. MXC consists of a connector that replaces RJ45 socket and small form-factor pluggable transceivers (SFP) with a new fibre technology called Corning ClearCurve LW.

Intel has been working with Corning on MXC for two years, with Intel bringing its expertise in silicon photonics and Corning focusing on the new fibre. The connector/interface is smaller than RJ45 and SFP, and that the connector can carry up to 1.6 terabits per second (Tbps).

Nick Farrell

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