Featured Articles

Intel takes credit for three-way 4K gaming

Intel takes credit for three-way 4K gaming

All of a sudden Intel is talking about desktop gaming like there is no tomorrow and it is pushing it. The…

More...
Nvidia Shield Tablet 32GB 4G LTE out for pre orders

Nvidia Shield Tablet 32GB 4G LTE out for pre orders

Nvidia has finally revealed the shipping date of its Shield Tablet 32GB in 4G LTE flavour and in case you pre-order…

More...
Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple has finally unveiled its eagerly awaited smartwatch and surprisingly it has dropped the "i" from the brand, calling it simply…

More...
Skylake 14nm announced

Skylake 14nm announced

Kirk B. Skaugen, Senior Vice President General Manager, PC Client Group has showcased Skylake, Intel’s second generation 14nm architecture.

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 27 August 2013 09:26

Hacker can take out phones in an area

Written by Nick Farrell

USENIX Security conference warned 

The USENIX Security conference has been warned that by tweaking the firmware on certain kinds of phones, a hacker could make it so other phones in the area are unable to receive incoming calls or SMS messages.

The hacker modifies the baseband processor on some Motorola phones and tricking some older 2G GSM networks into not delivering calls and messages. The hack could shut down some small localised mobile networks by spying on the messages sent from phone towers and not delivering them.

Kévin Redon, a Berlin-based telecommunications researcher said that the hacked firmware, named OsmocomBB, can block some calls and messages by responding to them before the phones that were initially intended to receive them do. The researchers added their OsmocomBB baseband processor runs a simple version of the GSM stack to two different Motorola phones, the C123 and the C118, to observe on air traffic and respond to specific paging requests, or calls.

The trio claims it’s possible to perform targeted denial of service attacks against single subscribers and as well against large geographical regions within a metropolitan area. The trio was able to carry out the attack on a variety of German mobile phone operators including O2, Vodaphone, T-Mobile and E-Plus.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments