Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 29 August 2013 08:56

Google wins Scroogle patent

Written by Nick Farrell

Search user emails to hit them with adverts

Google won a patent to search a user’s email to hit them with adverts. Google has been awarded a patent on a “System and method for targeting information based on message content in a reply,” which includes the company’s practice of serving up ads based on the contents of messages sent via the Gmail service.

Microsoft has dubbed this practice as "Scroogled” and used it as part of an advertising campaign as to why you should not use Google. While Google doesn’t address that criticism or use that word in the patent filing, but the company does take its own subtle jabs at Microsoft in the diagrams accompanying the patent.

One implies that the Microsoft Access database file pose a security risk, and another that suggests alternatives to Access next to a product search for the software. Google filed for the patent in September 2010, long before Microsoft’s “Scroogled” campaign began. The patent was officially granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office here.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments