Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 27 September 2013 08:17

US mulls mobile use during take off

Written by Nick Farrell

Is it worth risking a plane crash?

US air safety regulators are about to start considering allowing people to use mobile devices, laptops and tablets during flights. The new rules are likely to increase use of in-flight Internet service and allow passengers to plug their own electronics into in-flight entertainment systems.

Current FAA rules require devices be switched off below 10,000 feet and ban mobile calls at any altitude because of the risk they can interfere with airplane radios and other systems. But the FAA has worked out that many mobile phone owners do not care if their plane crashes, provided that they can text their friends to say that they are on the plane and tell them it is crashing. Many passengers routinely ignore the rules, leaving devices on purposely or by accident.

What is possible is that the report will suggest specific ways that other electronics can be made safer in other phases of flight, by plane makers airlines and others involved in flight safety. The FAA has long wrestled with the issue of electronics on flights, publishing its first rule in 1966, after studies showed FM radios could interfere with navigation systems. Pilots complain that they have heard mobile phone noise in their headsets while flying as the phones tried to connect to cell towers.

 

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments