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Friday, 25 October 2013 11:54

Microsoft copies Apple for a disaster

Written by Nick Farrell

Can’t fix this

Microsoft’s plan to copy Apple’s disastrous business plan could results in millions of Surface tablets being chucked away because they can’t be fixed.

The software giant had a look at Apple’s ideas to make a quick buck out of users by forcing them to either have them fixed by its genius bars, or buy a new one, and thought it was a great idea. But like many things Microsoft, it has resulted in a new Surface tablet which is expensive and cannot be fixed if it goes wrong.

iFixit said that the Surface Pro 2 looks a lot like the original Surface Pro, and it's built the same, too. But it is packed full of glue and more than 90 screws. This makes it impossible to repair and if it goes wrong, it will have to be chucked out.

If you can pry it open without destroying it, the only difference is that it has a powered by a fourth-generation Intel Core i5 processor based on the Haswell microarchitecture. It is still a 1.7GHz quad-core processor, just like the old one, so you are not likely to see much performance improvement.

Given that the new one is unrepairable, it is probably better to buy the older model at a cheaper price then if it does break you will not care so much.

Nick Farrell

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