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Monday, 04 November 2013 11:35

Swisscom builds a national cloud

Written by Nick Farrell



Loosen the dependence on US outfits

Swisscom is building a "Swiss Cloud" that could loosen the grip of US on the cloud industry.

There are some fears that by giving data to US outfits you could be handing all your secrets to the US spooks. Companies are looking for a way to shield sensitive data from the prying eyes of foreign intelligence services and that is where Swisscom thinks it can move in. After all, the Swiss managed to keep shedloads of Nazi gold out of the prying eyes of the world for decades, why not data.

Swisscom's head of IT services Andreas Koenig claimed that setting up a home cloud was unrelated to the recent NSA revelations and driven more by a desire to cut costs and make its systems more dynamic.

However, as the technology to protect against illegal threats progresses, Koenig says it will start to make more sense to store data in locations where strict privacy laws make it harder to retrieve sensitive information. Swisscom would have to receive a formal request from a prosecutor before allowing access to data something which is useless to the spooks unless they have a target in mind.

Nick Farrell

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