Featured Articles

LG G Watch R ships in two weeks

LG G Watch R ships in two weeks

The LG G Watch R, the first Android Wear watch with a truly round face, is coming soon and judging by…

More...
LG unveils NUCLUN big.LITTLE SoC

LG unveils NUCLUN big.LITTLE SoC

LG has officially announced its first smartphone SoC, the NUCLUN, formerly known as the Odin.

More...
Microsoft moves 2.4 million Xbox Ones

Microsoft moves 2.4 million Xbox Ones

Microsoft has announced that it move 2.4 million consoles in fiscal year 2015 Q1. The announcement came with the latest financial…

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 27 November 2013 12:43

Newegg loses patent troll case

Written by Nick Farrell



Jury comes up with shock verdict

In a shock verdict , a jury ruled Monday against Newegg, an e-commerce company defending itself in a lawsuit brought by patent troll.

The verdict awards the plaintiff, TQP Development, $2.3 million for patent infringements in the online retailer’s security system. This was despite the fact that the court heard evidence from Ron Rivest and Whitfield Diffie who really did invent the technology before TQP’s patent.

The online retailer told Ars Technica that it would appeal. The company does have the cash to do so and it always promised that even if it lost it would appeal. The fear is that it is possible that almost all technology out there could have some weird, ancient, and wide patent attached to it and companies could be forced to pay over the odds to patent trolls.

This particular patent is a worry because many companies are leaning on encryption to keep the US and UK spies out of their networks. Now it is starting to look like all encryption might fall under TQP’s patent.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments