Featured Articles

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple has finally unveiled its eagerly awaited smartwatch and surprisingly it has dropped the "i" from the brand, calling it simply…

More...
Skylake 14nm announced

Skylake 14nm announced

Kirk B. Skaugen, Senior Vice President General Manager, PC Client Group has showcased Skylake, Intel’s second generation 14nm architecture.

More...
Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

The day has finally come and it appears that most rumors were actually spot on as Apple has now officially unveiled…

More...
CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich just kicked off the IDF 2014 keynote and it started with a phone avatar, some Katy Perry…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 02 December 2013 11:49

Harvard science invents 3D printed batteries

Written by Nick Farrell



HP rubs its paws

A Harvard scientist has come up with a way to 3D print rechargeable batteries. Jennifer Lewis has created some new inks and create special nozzles and extruders for 3D printing batteries and other simple electronic components.

These functional inks contain nanoparticles of different compounds such as lithium for batteries and silver for wires. They get printed at room temperature as a liquid, but become a solid after printing. It also means that electronics and batteries can be manufactured together and in configurations that have not been possible before.

Lewis printed a battery that is just 1mm square with an accuracy of 100nm and the reliability of a commercial battery. Functional inks, nozzles and extruders was first introduced back in June and is still at the early stages. However, Lewis has reached a point now where patents exist covering how they function, and the tech is starting to be licensed.

She wants to get them into the hands of manufacturers, but also doesn’t see a reason why a 3D printer couldn’t be offered for home users.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments