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Tuesday, 03 December 2013 12:19

The cost of being Anonymous

Written by Nick Farrell



$183,000 a minute

Taking part in an Anonymous DoS attack cost a Wisconsin man $183,000 restitution and resulted in him having two years probation.

Eric Rosol, 38, admitted taking part in a cyber attack sponsored by the hacker group Anonymous against Kansas conglomerate Koch Industries in February 2011. Apparently, Rosol’s involvement in the attack was worth $183,000 even though he was probably only online for a minute and part of an attack which involved thousands.

The attack on the Koch webpage was launched on February 28, 2011, when Madison, Wisconsin, was the centre of demonstrations by unions and supporters against a drive by the Republican-led state legislature and governor to curb the powers of many public sector unions. 

The denial of service attack caused Koch's website to go offline for about 15 minutes, US Attorney Barry Grissom in Wichita, Kansas, said. Rosol pleaded guilty to one misdemeanour count of accessing a protected computer, Grissom said. Wichita-based Koch Industries paid $183,000 to a consulting firm to protect its website, he said.

Nick Farrell

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