Featured Articles

Analyst reveals Apple Watch spec

Analyst reveals Apple Watch spec

An analyst has examined the Apple Watch supply chain in an effort to ascertain the exact spec of Cupertino’s new gadget…

More...
Nvidia's first 20nm product is a mobile SoC

Nvidia's first 20nm product is a mobile SoC

For much of the year we were under the impression that the second generation Maxwell will end up as a 20nm…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

It appears that Nvidia has been feeling the pulse of the market and took some note from comments regarding the original…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 03 January 2014 11:50

Wireless combination router/DSL modems have a back door

Written by Nick Farrell



Let the hackers in

A security expert has found a backdoor to wireless combination router/DSL modems that could allow an attacker to reset the router’s configuration and gain access to the administrative control panel. It works on several Linksys and Netgear DSL modems, exploits an open port accessible over the wireless local network.

It is not an attack which works over the net. The attacker has to be on the local network. It could be used to commandeer a wireless access point and allow an attacker to get unfettered access to local network resources which is messy. Eloi Vanderbeken posted details of the attack to Github. He found the backdoor when he was trying to get access to the administrative console of his family’s Linksys WAG200G wireless DSL gateway wirelessly. He wanted to limit how much bandwidth the others in the house were using, but had turned off wireless access to the administration web console and had forgotten his administrative password.

The router responded to messages over an unusual TCP port number: 32764. He downloaded a copy of the Linksys firmware and commenced reverse-engineering the binary MIPS code. What he found was a simple interface that allowed him to send commands to the router without being authenticated as the administrator.

Vanderbecken found that the interface allowed him to execute a number of commands directly against the router, including a command-line shell. Using the commands he discovered, he was able to write a script that allowed him to turn wireless access to administration on and reset the web password.

More here.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments