Featured Articles

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD is fast tracking stacked DRAM deployment and a new presentation leaked by the company  points to APUs with stacked DRAM,…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel has introduced seven new Haswell mobile parts and four Bay Trail SoC chips, but most of them are merely clock…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 24 January 2014 10:52

Sugar coated battery could hit shops

Written by Nick Farrell



Spoon full of sugar helps the medicine go down

A sugar-powered battery could be powering smart phones and tablets in three years.

Researchers from the Virginia Tech College of Agriculture and Life Sciences have powered a device using partially digested starch found in foods like potatoes. They think that it could extend the battery life of devices such as smart phones by ten times more than the lithium-ion smart phone batteries.

The battery uses a synthetic-enzyme pathway to break down the sugar with the help of partially digested starch. If it does ever take off it could provide a cheap, refillable and more environmentally friendly way to power technology.

In a press release by Virginia Tech associate professor of biological systems engineering Percival Zhang said: "Sugar is a perfect energy-storage compound in nature. So it's only logical that we try to harness this natural power in an environmentally friendly way to produce a battery.”

High-energy plants like potatoes are broken down into sugar called maltodextrin which is then further broken down. The process releases electrons which are used to generate a current which can power electronic devices and only create a by-product of water. It could be a matter of time before they also power objects like cars, but if Big Oil finds out about that then Virginia Tech could find itself bought out and is scientists killed off.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments