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Monday, 03 February 2014 14:23

EU wants to disable crims’ cars remotely

Written by Fudzilla staff



Turns your German car into a French one

When it’s not bailing out corrupt member states that lied about their deficits for years, the EU likes to look at new technologies and one of them involves killing cars remotely.

The EU is reportedly developing a device that would remotely stop any vehicle. This would allow police to put an end to any chase or getaway, provided the criminals don’t find a way around it, which they most certainly will.

The Telegraph reports that the device could be installed in all new cars sold in Europe by the end of the decade. It would allow police to stop all cars from a central headquarters with the flick of a switch. The device would cut the fuel supply and stop any vehicle in no time. 

It sounds like a nice way of ending dangerous car chases on motorways, but it remains to be seen how the system will actually work.

Criminals usually find ways of getting around such technologies and car thieves have been employing GSM and GPS jammers for years. This gives them plenty of time to get their cars across borders and into countries that don’t really care if you drive a stolen car and they actually view car theft as a lucrative industry.

 

Fudzilla staff

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