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Thursday, 20 February 2014 09:08

AMD going after new market segments

Written by Fudzilla staff



Cheap B2B entry-level desktops

AMD is apparently shifting its approach in the Euro channel and it wants to grab more B2B market share from Intel.

Neil Spicer, the newly appointed head of AMD’s EMEA CPU business, told Channelweb that the next upgrade cycle is coming and AMD is ready. Spicer expects new Kaveri APUs to make a difference in the entry-level PC space, especially in emerging markets.

In addition, AMD is focusing a lot of its efforts on new market segments.

"In 2012/13 we recognised 90 per cent of our revenue in the PC and client market, but by 2015, 50 per cent of the company’s revenue will come from emerging growth segments such as consoles and we are moving to new designs in the tablet market," said Spicer.

One of AMD’s biggest targets is the B2B entry-level desktop space. Spicer points out that AMD’s overall platform cost is relatively low. He notes that it is possible to build an entry level PC for peanuts, as a quad A4-4000 APU and a motherboard cost about $70. Such competitive pricing should attract small, independent PC builders, reckons Spicer.

The biggest news, however, is that AMD expects emerging market segments to account for 50 percent of the company’s revenue sometime next year. This means we should expect more tablet designs wins from AMD over the next year or so.

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