Featured Articles

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 20 February 2014 14:10

Netflix uses cloud to build online recommendation engine

Written by Nick Farrell



Follows the brain

Netflix is delving into “deep learning” artificial intelligence that seeks to solve particularly hard problems using computer systems that mimic the structure and behaviour of the brain.

The company is taking a slightly different tack from Facebook and Google which is trying similar technology. The company plans to run its deep learning algorithms on Amazon’s cloud service. Like Google, Netflix is relying on GPUs to build its neural networks. But unlike Google, it’s not going to build its own GPU farms. It developed its algorithms on its own workstations, but plans on tapping an Amazon cloud service that lets you run software using GPUs.

So far Netflix has not released details about how it will apply neural networks to personalized recommendations. But what is important is that Netflix does describe efforts to get its deep learning system ready for the cloud. If it can get its plans to work then smaller start-ups and independent researchers launch their own deep learning experiments atop Amazon.

Not only will this push the whole of deep learning movement forward, it could also mean that smaller companies which cannot afford huge server farms can form their own projects.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments