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Thursday, 20 February 2014 14:12

IT workers breed brighter kids

Written by Nick Farrell



When they do find someone to breed with

An OECD report into the link between student performance and their parents’ occupations has revealed that if a kid has at least one parent working in IT, business or engineering they will do better in school.

The news will be greeted with glee amongst the IT community where it will be suddenly be possible to use a pick-up line “but our kids will be good in school.” Not only were the kids of information and communications technology (ICT) workers top of the country in maths and science, they were also found to be the best in terms of reading.

Australian Information Industry Association CEO Suzanne Campbell said: “ICT workers’ skills include the analytical, the innovative, the creative thinking, the “can-do”, curiosity and solving business problems.

“My expectation is that the children of ICT workers are enjoying the benefits of being exposed to all of those skills and being inspired in their family environment to take risks.”

Nick Farrell

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