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Monday, 24 February 2014 10:37

802.11ad coming to phones next year

Written by Fudzilla staff



Pointlessly fast

Wilocity announced that it plans to showcase a curious phone at the Mobile World Congress and the company claims it will be the first 802.11ad enabled device.

However, 802.11ad integration comes a bit later. The company believes vendors will start integrating the new standard in the latter half of the year, with the first devices hitting the market in the first half of 2015. Wilocity will start sampling the new chipset in Q3 2014.

802.11ad is an interesting beast. It uses the 60GHz band, which is much higher than the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands used by current 802.11 standards. This also results in plenty of bandwidth and 802.11ad devices should hit 5Gbps.

However, there is a rather big downside to the new standard. The new high frequency standard doesn’t cope with air and obstacles very well. The signal is much less likely to penetrate walls and even without anything in its way the range is rather limited. When the device goes out of range, the chipset simply goes from 802.11ad to 802.11ac or 802.11n.

You can check out the geeky details over at CNET

Fudzilla staff

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