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Thursday, 06 March 2014 11:09

Why hasn’t Samsung released 64-bit Exynos parts?

Written by Nick Farrell



The problem is Google

While everyone else is pressing to get a 64-bit AP into the shops, Samsung seems rather relaxed about it claiming that it is leaning towards optimisation technology.

64-bit ARM chips are seen as a way to overcome the limit of RAM capacity, and to have a more efficient processing structure. Qualcomm, MediaTek and even Apple have come up with 64-bit processors. Word on the street is that Samsung is intensifying efforts to develop its own 64-bit processor, but instead of developing a new chip ahead of schedule, the Korean tech giant is reportedly putting more weight on product optimisation.

It makes sense. Google's Android platform cannot fully support 64-bit architecture so there is little point having the chip ready when you flagship OS can’t cope.

One of the biggest problems with this approach is that Samsung will find it hard to convince customers that they are not missing out by no getting 64-bit. Our guess is that if Google pulls finger Samsung would have a 64-bit processor ready and that every morning a Samsung exec rings the GooglePlex and asks “is it there yet?”.

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