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Friday, 21 March 2014 08:17

Turkish PM bans Twitter

Written by Fudzilla staff



Spreading too much FUD

The Glorious Republic of Turkey has blocked access to Twitter, following threats made by prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

In a recent speech Erdogan said he would wipe out Twitter and went on to talk about international conspiracies. These conspiracies usually revolve around allegations of corruption, which have surfaced in recent months.

Although Turkey is enjoying a period of strong economic growth unmatched anywhere in the region, many Turks aren't too happy about Erdogan's policies. Erdogan's base is in the rural areas, while city dwellers tend to have a more secular, liberal outlook.

Erdogan has dismissed the corruption allegations and he went on to say that he does not care what the international community says about him.

"Everyone will see the power of the Turkish Republic," he cautioned.

The move came after Twitter refused to adhere to a court ruling, ordering it to take down some questionable links.

It should be noted that political manoeuvring, wrangling and a recent spate of riots have not had much of an impact on Turkey's economy. The country has the world's 17th largest GDP and it is growing at a steady pace. Turkey's GDP went from $196 billion in 2001 to $774 billion in 2011.

While Erdogan's AK party gets a lot of flak for some of its conservative policies, at least it seems to be doing something right.

Fudzilla staff

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