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Monday, 24 March 2014 11:54

Intel wants to re-invent the desktop

Written by Nick Farrell



Still mileage in it

Chipzilla told the Game Developers Conference that it wanted to reinventing the desktop PC.

According to the company the desktop has gone from just a beige tower to all these new designs which feature touch, 170+ desktop and all-in-one focused apps. It does not sound re-invented to us, but in the GDC release, Intel goes on to cite "tiny PCs," small Steambox gaming systems, and portable all-in-one PCs as reinvention.

Lisa Graff, an Intel vice president and general manager earlier said at GDC for those who demand the highest processor core count and memory bandwidth on the desktop, Intel will deliver an 8-core, 16-thread Intel Core processor Extreme Edition in the second half of this year. That 4th generation Intel Core Haswell chip will also support the new, faster DDR4 memory standard.

Chipzilla clearly thinks that gamer PCs will help it kickstart that market, but “re-invent it?” Nah.

The PC market is stuffed at the moment because PCs can pretty do everything that people want and they don’t need to upgrade. Cash strapped companies don’t want to buy new ones because you only need a certain about of power to surf the net and use Office.

This isn't the first time Intel tried to talk up frugal and power efficient mini PCs. Graff brought them up last month, in an interview with Ars Technica. Since many consumers and businesses don't need a new PC for the sake of marginally better performance, shafing a few pennies from the electric bill every week could be a major selling point for such systems. In essence, a tiny PC with a 10-20W processor can save quite a bit of cash if it is used on a regular basis, in a business setting. That might make them an easier sell.



Nick Farrell

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