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Friday, 28 March 2014 11:08

MIT puts javascript onto Google Glass

Written by Nick Farrell



Move things with your eyes

MIT researchers have been installing javascript onto Google Glass and have been surprised by what they could make it do.

Brandyn White, a PhD candidate at the University of Maryland, and Scott Greenberg, a PhD candidate at MIT, led a workshop at the MIT Media Lab to showcase an open source project called WearScript, a Javascript environment that runs on Google Glass. Wearscript lets developers experiment with new user interface concepts and input devices to push beyond the HMI limits of wearables.

White demonstrated how Glass's UI extends beyond its touchpad, winks, and head movements by adding a homemade eye tracker to Glass as an input device. The camera and controller were dissected from a $25 PC video camera and attached to the Glass frame with a 3D-printed mount. A few modifications were made, such as replacing the obtrusively bright LEDs with infrared LEDs, and a cable was added with a little soldering.

With this eye tracker and Wearscript, the researchers created a new interface by playing Super Mario on Google Glass with just eye movements.

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