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Monday, 31 March 2014 10:45

UK finally legalises CD and DVD ripping

Written by Nick Farrell



Better late than never

The UK Government has revised copyright law which will legalize CD and DVD copying for personal use. The changes go into effect in June, and will also broaden other forms of fair use, including parody and quotation rights. Although most people have been doing it for decades the UK bowed to pressure from the content industry to keep the practice illegal.

After a public consultation, and realising that being one of the few countries in Europe where it was illegal the UK Government decided to side with consumers for once. Starting in July people are free to make copies of DVDs, CDs and other types of media, as long as it’s for personal use. The UK’s Intellectual Property Office said that the changes will mean that you will be able to copy a book or film you have purchased for one device onto another without infringing copyright.

More controversial are the changes that will mean that people can legally store copies of their music and movies in the cloud. If you give, others access to your files you can expect to be sued by big content. Also controversial is a change which will allow people are free to sell any media they purchase, but all backup copies will have to be destroyed.

A Government-commissioned survey, which found that 85 per cent of consumers already thought that DVD and CD ripping, was legal.

Nick Farrell

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