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Thursday, 01 May 2014 11:58

Big content reveals scheme to charge for larger screens

Written by Nick Farrell



Bigger will be more expensive

Jeffrey Katzenberg, CEO of film studio DreamWorks wants people with bigger screens to pay more. Speaking at the Milken Global Conference in Los Angeles, Katzenberg said that in the decade he would like to see the movie industry move to the new pricing model. 

Under his plan, films would be released to cinemas for three weeks and then made available for download, with the price dependent on the hardware. A movie screen will be $15. A 75-inch TV will be $4.00. A smartphone will be $1.99. That enterprise that will exist throughout the world, when that happens, and it will happen, it will reinvent the enterprise of movies, he said. 

Katzenberg's plans would mean a hardware identifier and we suspect that anyone with a big screen will be buying software to convince Hollywood they are really watching the flick on a mobile. We would have thought it would require the mother of all DRMS. Katzenberg said the pricing model was essential to ensure that Hollywood keeps on making huge wodges of cash from its content; something he thinks is getting less of an issue.

Obviously with just three weeks at the movies, in theatre piracy would drop, but there would be a market for DRM free content.

Nick Farrell

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