Featured Articles

LG G Watch R ships in two weeks

LG G Watch R ships in two weeks

The LG G Watch R, the first Android Wear watch with a truly round face, is coming soon and judging by…

More...
LG unveils NUCLUN big.LITTLE SoC

LG unveils NUCLUN big.LITTLE SoC

LG has officially announced its first smartphone SoC, the NUCLUN, formerly known as the Odin.

More...
Microsoft moves 2.4 million Xbox Ones

Microsoft moves 2.4 million Xbox Ones

Microsoft has announced that it move 2.4 million consoles in fiscal year 2015 Q1. The announcement came with the latest financial…

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 23 May 2014 09:20

NSA listens to every call in Afghanistan

Written by Nick Farrell

Now two countries have blanket snooping

Wikileaks has revealed that all phone calls in Afghanistan are being monitored by the NSA’s Somalget tool. Earlier this week Glenn Greenwald revealed that the NSA had been monitoring all the domestic and international phone calls of the Bahamas' but redacted the identity of a second country as he believed it could lead to the death of innocent people.

Editor-in-chief Julian Assange had no problem with that, after all he has not been in the news for a while and what are the deaths of a few innocent people compared to him not being noticed.

"WikiLeaks cannot be complicit in the censorship of victim state X. The country in question is Afghanistan," he said.

"The Intercept stated that the US government asserted that the publication of this name might lead to a 'rise in violence'. Such claims were also used by the administration of Barack Obama to refuse to release further photos of torture at Abu Ghraib in Iraq."

Assange continued: "The Intercept stated that the US government asserted that the publication of this name might lead to a 'rise in violence'. Such claims were also used by the administration of Barack Obama to refuse to release further photos of torture at Abu Ghraib in Iraq."

The Somalget programme records actual conversations before storing them for up to 30 days, when the agency wipes them from their records.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments