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Monday, 26 May 2014 11:07

SSDs could be tweaked to 300 percent faster

Written by Nick Farrell

Japanese come up with simple solution

Researchers at the Chuo University in Japan have fixed a basic design flaw in SSDs which could mean that they could run more than 300 percent faster. 

Officially unveiled at the 2014 IEEE International Memory Workshop in Taipei, the researchers have written a brand new middleware for the drives that controls how the data is written to and stored on the device.

They use a 'logical block address scrambler' which prevents data being written to a new 'page' on the device unless it is really needed.

Instead, it is placed in a block to be erased and consolidated later. This means significantly less behind-the-scenes file copying that results in increased performance from idle, during intensive jobs and a longer lifetime for the drive as SSDs have a finite number of possible write operations.

The drives write data 55 percent less often than drives without at speeds of up to 300 percent. This could enable high-end devices to reach transfer speeds of 1.5GB/s as current models achieve around 500MB/s typically.

The drives used 60 percent less power.

It is possible that the new tech will work with existing devices which could get firmware updates in the near future.

Last modified on Monday, 26 May 2014 14:44

Nick Farrell

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