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Friday, 30 May 2014 09:49

Court rejects Apple’s cartel trail stall

Written by Nick Farrell

Shut up and face the music

Apple has been told by a court that it has to quit stalling and face its jury trial to determine damages after the company was found to have colluded to fix the prices of e-books. The fruity cargo cult has been doing its best to deny that it ever did anything wrong, despite being found guilty by a jury and all its accomplices copping a plea.

Most of Apple’s problem is that it was following the orders of Steve Jobs and they believed that whatever he said must be true. Apple says that it should not be sentenced until its lawyers manage to reverse its guilty finding by the jury. In a brief order, the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York said the July 14 trial should proceed as scheduled, while Apple separately pursues its appeal of U.S. District Judge Denise Cote's ruling that it conspired with five publishers to raise e-book prices.

Cote ruled last year after a non-jury trial that the conduct of the iPad maker impeded e-book competitors such as Amazon.com. More than two dozen state attorneys general joined the Department of Justice in suing Apple over e-books price fixing. Those states, as well as a group of consumers, are seeking up to $840 million in damages.

Cote has also appointed a federal monitor to supervise Apple's compliance policies. The company has moaned constantly that the monitor's activities were intrusive and costly often spending a fortune on lawyers to tell the court that.

Nick Farrell

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