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Thursday, 12 June 2014 09:41

US chain investigates data breach

Written by Nick Farrell

y money

Ronald Regan wanted for questioning

Credit and debit card data reportedly stolen from restaurant locations as the nationwide chain P.F. Chang’s China Bistro is investigating claims of a data breach involving a ton of data nicked from its restaurants.

Thousands of newly-stolen credit and debit cards went up for sale on rescator.so which is an underground store best known for flogging cards nicked in the Target breach.

There are 204 P.F. Chang’s restaurants in the United States, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Canada, Argentina, Chile and the Middle East. Banks contacted for this story reported cards apparently stolen from PFC locations in Florida, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Nevada and North Carolina.

The new batch of stolen cards, dubbed “Ronald Reagan” by the card shop’s owner, is the first major glut of cards released for sale on the fraud shop since March 2014.

The items for sale are not cards, per se, but instead data copied from the magnetic stripe on the backs of credit cards.

If you have that information you can re-encode the data onto new plastic and then use the counterfeit cards to buy high-priced items at big box stores, goods that can be quickly resold.

 

Nick Farrell

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