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Friday, 13 June 2014 10:58

Google Glass gets doctor’s orders

Written by Nick Farrell

If it quacks like a quack

Drchrono an electronic medical record company has developed a new application for the device it claims is the first "wearable health record" for Google Glass users.

Doctors who register for the Drchrono app for Glass can use it to record a consultation or surgery with the patient's permission. Videos, photos and notes are stored in the patient's electronic medical record or in Box, a cloud-based storage and collaboration service and can be shared with the patient on request.

Bill Metaxas, a podiatrist based in San Francisco, warned fellow physicians to take precautions before using Glass, such as obtaining patient consent and "locking down security settings."

Glass is no more or less secure than tablet devices such as the iPad, which are routinely used in clinical practices, which we have to admit is probably not the best endorsement.

Metaxas, who uses Glass in the operating room and in patient consultations, said 99 percent of his patients agree to the gadget, but it is still early days and most of his fellow physicians have yet to adopt the technology.

It has been estimated that there are 20 venture-backed startups catering to this niche of physicians. The majority of these Glass apps, including Augmedix and Pristine, are complying with federal regulation that protects privacy, known as HIPAA.

Drchrono worked closely with Box, one of its early investors, and the Google Glass team.

 

Nick Farrell

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