Featured Articles

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC has announced that it will begin volume production of 16nm FinFET products in the second half of 2015, in late…

More...
AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD has missed earnings targets and is planning a substantial job cuts. The company reported quarterly earnings yesterday and the street is…

More...
Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

As expected, Google has finally released the eagerly awaited Nexus 6 phablet and its first 64-bit device, the Nexus 9 tablet.

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 26 June 2014 12:46

More people read news online

Written by Nick Farrell



Print is a Norwegian Blue

More people now access their news via the Internet as by the traditional route of reading a printed newspaper.

UK media regulator Ofcom said that in its News Consumption in the UK report that 41 per cent of the public accesses news via the web and mobile apps, compared to 40 per cent who read printed newspapers. To be fair newspaper publishers will take comfort from the fact that the percentage of print readers has remained stable over the past year but the proportion accessing news digitally has increased sharply from 32 per cent in the last 12 months.

The findings should convince newspaper publishers of the need to develop their digital news offerings or die. Or come up with ways of making money from online content. At the moment it is difficult to make a buck online. The increase in digital access to news is being driven by younger generations, with 60 per cent of 16-24 year olds following this pattern. The web and apps have also overhauled radio as a source of news, with only 36 per cent now using this medium.

Television is still the most popular source of news, although the 75 per cent who cited it as a source was fewer than the 78 per cent recorded in 2013.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments